Neighborhood Nature

Our Family's Nature Blog

Nature News: Bursting Buds and Tame Wildflowers March 26, 2009

Filed under: Cultivated Flowers,People,Plants,Seasons,Spring,Wildflowers — saltthesandbox @ 4:07 pm
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In our neighborhood, the last few days have been cool, often cloudy, and sometimes rainy. Searching the streets of south Oak Park turned up a few spring bulbs about to burst into bloom. As usual, the flowers on the sunnier south sides of homes were further along:

This patch of Hyacinth has several stages of buds, from tightly closed green ones to colorful buds beginning to burst.

This patch of Hyacinth has several stages of buds, from tightly closed green ones to colorful buds beginning to burst.

At several other homes, larger Daffodil plants were beginning to catch up to the Miniature Daffodils we photographed last week for Gail’s birthday — they weren’t blooming yet, but they were getting close:

These Daffodil buds were also almost ready to bloom.

These Daffodil buds were almost ready to bloom.

Go here to see what Daffodil buds looked like a week ago, when they first emerged from the soil (see the bottom of the post).

I was inspired by the almost-opened buds, so this morning I checked a secluded corner of our back yard, against a south-facing wooden fence. Guess what I found? The Miniature Daffodils we bought last year for Gail’s birthday also were beginning to open. As the day progressed with intermittent sun, four buds finally bloomed:

Gail's 2008 potted Daffodils bloomed in our garden in 2009!

Gail's 2008 potted Daffodils bloomed in our back garden in 2009!

We bought these flowers as part of the American Cancer Society’s 2008 Daffodil Days. (The 2009 Daffodil Days just ended.)

I guess birthday flowers that support a good cause should be my favorite flowers of the spring so far, but they’re not. My favorites are some spring wildflowers living the tame life in a street-side garden near Maple Park. They’re Bloodroot, a common woodland wildflower that I was surprised to find in this residential neighborhood:

The Bloodroots flower stalks are wrapped in leaves when they first emerge from the soil.

Bloodroot flower stalks are wrapped in leaves when they first emerge from the soil.

Like many North American wildflowers, Bloodroot was used as medicine and more by Native Americans. For me, it’s a reminder that I need to get to an old-growth woodland soon!

For tomorrow I’ll have good news and bad news to share. Tree flowers are back, some for better, and some for worse.

 

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